Thursday, April 11, 2013

Yardage Chicken

I believe the term Yardage Chicken was coined by Georgie of Tikki Knits, she at least was the one to introduce it to me, and a lot of other knitters! I am currently on the journey of yardage chicken, and I have to admit a mixture of enjoyment (oh the adrenaline!) and fear.

In case you aren't sure yardage chicken is when you don't think you are going to have enough yarn to finish a project. Will you win or will you lose!

The project I am working on is my Alec XL - the man sized version of my Alec pattern. I am knitting it for my husband in a Large size (not XL thankfully, no way would I win that game!)  and when I had the yarn custom dyed by the lovely Jo of Jodulbug, I was sure I had ordered enough....

Yes custom, hand dyed. That might add another element to the game.

I have finished a sleeve and have nearly finished the body. So assuming the small ball below finishes off the body and edging (EEP this is the bit I'm not sure about), and the second sleeves takes the same amount as the first sleeve, that leaves approximately 40g for the collar. Which I'm hoping will be enough! I could do it without a collar, but my husband WANTS the collar.


This yardage chicken event, I am knitting furiously. But in the past I have been known to put a knit down and not knit it out of fear of running out completely. How do you handle yardage chicken? Do you race or slow down?

I'm also reading Edge of Black, great for the circular stocking stitch portion knitting of this sweater, and a good read.

17 comments:

  1. I race and so does my mind - thinking up contingency plans or how I am going to get more, or what colour I can add in, will i get away with a random stripe?, can I do the collar a different colour? If so what and where will I get it from! Good luck. Hope you don't need a contingency plan!!!!!

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  2. I definitely race, so far I've won every time but I don't think my speed has anything to do with that at all unfortunately. One day I'll lose and it'll be with a yarn I can't get again. I hope you win your yardage chicken race, good luck!

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  3. I tend to race (as if I could outrun the end of the skein!) and also weigh the remaining yarn obsessively between rows.

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  4. I just kept going, quietly and nervously.... had to weave in ends as little as possible and use the longest tail to finish off the armhole edging! Huge sigh of relief when finished

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  5. I threw up my hands in disgust, went to the LYS and bought the last 3 skeins she had- just in case mind you. Blanket is knit and delivered to Ecuador, I used the Russian join twice. (I've gotten good at it mind you!)

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  6. ( had to comment on you adding word verification. I've been considering it. But, I know how much it drives me crazy typing words and numbers and sing out auto correct so I keep things the way they are in hopes of more readers commenting. So far I mostly get only comments from spammers- go figure)

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  7. I'm a bit scared of that with my current cardigan. My approach is to get sweaty palms, plough on in denial and breath fast...

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  8. Oh my, yes. I have played many a game of yardage chicken. Some I have won, some I have lost. But every time, I knit and knit and knit until I reach the end. The end of the yarn or the end of the project is always the question. I race!

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  9. Gotta love a game of yardage chicken! I tend to speed up getting more and more worked up until I either succeed or have to admit defeat

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  10. I have never heard of it that way but I will forever call it that now. I usually race, because I am dying to know. I've been ok for the most part before, and anytime I've had an issues it's usually during bind off so I have a similar yarn I can use for that.

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  11. That term is absolutely perfect for that kind of unfortunate point in a knitting project. This happens to me maybe 45% of the time, but I usually make it to the end. I can only think of two exceptions and both times the yarn I was using was discontinued and impossible to get. I have my fingers crossed for your project, hopefully you'll make it!

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  12. Ha, ha -- I haven't heard of this term before but I've definitely lived it. Whenever I'm playing a game of yardage chicken, my knitting speeds up but I have to admit, I always lose!

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  13. HAHAHA! Yardage Chicken. To me, racing against the end of the skein is the norm. :-D I hope you have enough to get your man-sized Alec finished. I say, race through it. It's like a band-aid, you've just got to pull it off. Trying to go slow will only prolong the misery.

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  14. I had no idea it had a name. And what a perfect one at that. I am currently working on a shrug and I have that niggling feeling that I am playing chicken again. Eeek - hope your sweater is one game of chicken you win.

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  15. Love it, yardage chicken. Had this twice recently with two projects, one ended up being just enough a metre or two left of each. The other I had loads! Hope you end up with enough.

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  16. I had never heard of this term before, but I suffer from it big time! I am such a yardage chicken that I almost always order way more yarn than I need. Which would explain the huge plastic container full of leftovers in my craft closet. :-)

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  17. So far I've not had an issue with this. Mostly because in the past I've made blankets and made them randomly enough so that if there was a shortage, I was able to cover it. I just ordered more than enough yarn to make my sweater. In fact, I'd rather have more than enough and have scraps for a random blanket project than run out of yarn I needed.

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